Wasted Ink Zine Distro: Community Building through Creative Expression

 

What does it take to turn your passion for DIY publications and community-building into a business?

 

I sat down with Charissa Lucille and Marna Kay, Co-Owners of Wasted Ink Zine Distro in Phoenix, Arizona to find out.

 

In 2015, Charissa and Marna opened up the first and only Zine shop in the Valley to create a space for people to learn about, look at, create, and buy self-published zines. Between full-time jobs, personal projects, and life, they’ve managed to create a special place for people to come together and express themselves and share individual perspectives.

 

Beyond the shop, they regularly organize poetry readings, open mic nights, pop-up zine shops, and workshops for zinesters of all ages.

 

So if you’re looking for a place filled with openness, acceptance, and creativity, look no further than Wasted Ink Zine Distro. To learn more about their journey, from when they first fell in love with zines to the struggles and rewards of running a business, be sure to check out the video!

Caroline Hudson-Naef: From Art School to Art Career

In the arts, we often perceive an art administration career as a practical, steady alternative to becoming a full-time, independent artist. But the skills and experiences required to pursue such a path can greatly differ from a studio art discipline.

 

However, with dedication and persistence, some artists are able to make the transition and excel in a position at an arts organization.

 

Not only do they have to adapt to new situations and develop a new skillset, but it also requires a shift in perspective.
So if you’re interested in making that shift, you’ll definitely want to hear what Caroline has to say!

 

Caroline Hudson-Naef is the Photography Arts Lab Manager at Art Intersection, “a place where creative individuals gather to learn, create, and exhibit.”

 

Located In Gilbert, AZ, Art Intersection offers gallery space, workshops and classes, a darkroom and digital lab, and one-on-one instruction to their community. And Caroline’s responsibilities encompass all the diverse functions of the business.

 

In this video, you’ll learn:

 

  • What kind of prior experiences helped Caroline get her job
  • What she enjoys most about working at an art center
  • Advice for early-career artists looking to for an arts administration position
  • The difficulties of balancing a full-time, arts-related job with her own creative practice

 

So watch the interview or read the full transcript in this blog post!

Zakk Vega: Opening a Music Studio + Building Community in Unlikely Places

I truly believe that having a good conversation is one of the best ways to learn — especially in the arts.

 

That’s exactly why I sat down with Zakk Vega, owner of Studio 270, a music studio in Yuma, Arizona.

 

When I found out that my friend Zakk was returning home to open a music studio after a couple of years touring, I was definitely taken by surprise.
Although Yuma isn’t a place short of talented artists and musicians, there has always been a lack of opportunities available to help develop and refine their creative skills. And when places did open up, they didn’t last for long…

 

Well, after a year since opening it’s doors, Studio 270 is still going strong. They offer affordable lessons, practice space, and a recording studio to a growing community of musicians in the far southwest. Not only are they providing a service that is greatly needed in Yuma, but they do it with contagious passion and dedication.

 

So if you’ve ever wondered what it takes to open up your own creative business (or what it takes for follow your creative dreams), whether it’s music-based or not, you’ll definitely find value in what Zakk has to say!